What is to come

Here you get an introduction to some of the projects that DHRTC is currently working on and the knowledge produced is expected to be ready during 2019.

Work in progress
Robust liquid-repelling coatings to decrease costs

Liquid-repelling surfaces (LRS) have tremendous potential to increase the flow through the wells. It can reduce the energy cost for pumping as well as prolong maintenance intervals for removing scales and biofilms which can severely decrease operational costs. The beauty of the LRS coating is that it can be deposited in a simple solution with the already oxidized metal from the existing corrosion on current wells. In the labs at DHRTC the LRS is tested with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, ultimately tuning the chemistry for maximum protection of the oil wells. The ultimate goal is to bring the new LRS well coating toward testing under realistic conditions.

What is to come

Here you get an introduction to some of the projects that DHRTC is currently working on and the knowledge produced is expected to be ready during 2019.

4D forward stratigraphic modelling to improve the geological model

The objective of this project is to identify the main controls on the deposition and distribution of clay in the Lower Cretaceous in the Danish Central Graben. This is done by constructing a stratigraphic model called DionisosFlowâ„¢ honoring observations and accounts for geological processes in the Valdemar area. This 4D model will improve the 3D static modelling by predicting facies distribution on the field scale and assessing the uncertainty associated with the geological model. 4D multi-lithology modelling is performed by incorporating the following parameters at each time step:

  • Accommodation (subsidence + eustasy)
  • Clastic sediment influx
  • In situ sediment production (carbonates)
  • Sediment transport (through diffusion)
Forecasting and preventing reservoir souring

Hydrocarbon reservoirs as a major part of the deep subsurface biosphere host indigenous microorganisms that live under harsh pressure and temperature conditions. After thousands of decades, these diffusion-driven environments have been isolated and stabilized. However, this stability can be altered during petroleum exploitation. This may result in reservoir souring, a phenomenon through which H2S gas is formed. Toxic and corrosive features of H2S have made reservoir souring a dangerous and costly process. This is why, DHRTC has constructed a new model that helps to prevent or minimize reservoir souring outcomes and thereby enable optimization of inhibitor dosage. This model relies on considering different physiques such as multiphase flow, mass transfer and microbial metabolism, each one characterizing an aspect of the reservoir souring process. The aim is to develop the model further for commercial use.

New techniques to monitor corrosion

The use of injecting seawater (water flooding) as a means of enhancing oil recovery significantly increases the possibility of corrosion failure of the tubulars as it increases the risk of water wetting the steel surface. Additionally, the chemical composition of the water fraction will change with time, and the overall temperature of the produced fluid will be lowered. All these changes needs to be evaluated with respect to material degradation and selection. Recreating these variations is challenging in a laboratory, but in this project the aim is to overcome the obstacles. Rigorous procedures and experimental set-ups are developed, opening up for understanding and determining the most important issues that needs to be continuously controlled and monitored. In 2019, DHRTC expects to introduce new techniques to monitor corrosion and scale formation. Those techniques will provide a greater understanding of the processes and the ways to mitigate it.