Troels ­Albrechtsen

Vice President Copenhagen Offshore Product Line at Total
DHRTC has come a long way and can be proud

Troels Albrechtsen was one of the founding fathers of DHRTC. As a representative of Maersk Oil, now Total, he and the partners in the Danish Underground Consortium (DUC) had a vision of bringing together five research institutions in order to create new and innovative solutions to the challenge of extracting the remaining oil and gas in the North Sea.

BY MARIANNE BOM

Now, almost half way into the scheduled timeframe of ten years, Troels Albrechtsen gives his views on the past and the future of DHRTC. After Total took over Maersk Oil in 2018, he became Vice President Copenhagen Offshore Product Line at Total.

What are the main accomplishments of the centre so far?

“It was a major accomplishment just to bring together the institutions within this framework. That was an innovation in our sector, and a first goal that the centre has fulfilled nicely. There were obstacles on the way but we overcame them and achieved a broad involvement that is evident from the publication list. Another accomplishment is the definition of the research programmes themselves, which are designed to answer the challenge of how to get more oil out of the ground, economically. Also, the centre has successfully adapted the programmes in response to the changing conditions brought about by the drop in oil price. There are already many good examples of specific deliverables from the program such as the 4D Maintenance Project and the AlarmTracker. We have come a long way and can be proud of what we have achieved so far.”

Troels Albrechtsen

In the longer term we should prepare for setting up a potential extension of DHRTC beyond the original 10 year time frame,” says Troels Albrechtsen, Vice President Copenhagen Offshore Product Line at Total

What are your expectations for the centre for the future?

“It is an important issue for the short term to follow up the scientific framework and
the revision made in 2018. We added new elements; and decided to focus more on the environmental aspects of the oil and gas industry. Another issue is how to bring
the centre’s results to fruition. Through the engagement of Total E&P in Esbjerg,
and the wider industry we shall build prototypes and bring innovations to bear on the implementation and use of specific deliverables. It is important for the future to show a positive impact on activities in the North Sea. It is also important to participate in the debate on climate change. We know that oil and gas will be used for a period of time. If we do not produce it, someone else will. So let us produce it in a safe and sound way.

What are your expectations for the future development of the interaction between Total and research and development in the centre?

“The first key to success is to continue to make the best use of knowledge among the five research institutions and to see everybody cooperating. The second is to engage with the service industry and create solutions that we can use in the North Sea, and to have researchers engage in the activities in the field of Total and other operators. This will happen through some of the technical committees; furthermore we have added a seat for Total in the Steering Committee to facilitate this development. I am not worried for the future. Total has taken over the activities in the North Sea with a real ambition to continue to develop them. The revision of DHRTC’s scientific framework was endorsed by the new owner, and Total is committed to bringing its technical abilities into the centre. In the longer term we should prepare for setting up a potential extension of DHRTC beyond the original 10 year time frame.”